Howzat?! An official decider for backyard cricket rules

Australians are being called on to end generations of debate by helping to create a set of official rules for one of the nation’s best-loved summer sports, backyard cricket.

The Australia Day Council of NSW (ADCNSW), with the support of Cricket NSW, is calling on the community to get onto social media to finalise rules of the game once and for all.

ADCNSW Chairman Angelos Frangopoulous said that with the cricket season in full swing – and the game very popular on 26 January – it’s the perfect time to create an official set of rules for playing at home.

“Families can debate for hours about whether the dog can be a fielder or whether you can get out on the first ball – we want to hear what you think the rules should be,” he said.

ADCNSW is inviting everyone to join the debate on its Facebook, Twitter and Instagram channels, encouraging comment on the rules used in homes across Australia, including six and out, behind stumps and out and leg before wicket.

Mr Frangopoulos said the most disputed rule is ‘tip and run’ – whether or not you must run once you’ve hit the ball.

“Those who grew up on backyard cricket know that ‘tip and run’ is the number one rule. If you don’t run once you’ve hit the ball – you’re out!”

Cricket NSW CEO Andrew Jones encouraged all NSW backyard batters and bowlers to get involved in this fiercely contested debate.

“Our national identity is built on cricket in all its forms – from The Ashes to the Boxing Day Test, this sport is intrinsically linked to our culture.

“Mitchell Starc, Steve Smith, Alex Blackwell and Ellyse Perry are just some of Australia’s greatest cricket heroes, proudly grown here in NSW.

“It was in their backyards during the long summer holidays that most were first introduced to the sport they love.

“It’s fitting that the people of NSW, the fans of cricket and the real backyard cricket champions, are having a hand in shaping our favourite sport.”

The Official Rules for Backyard Cricket will be published on the Australia Day website on 26 January 2018. To join the discussion, visit the Australia Day Facebook page or find out more at www.australiaday.com.au.

Top of page